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The East End of Long Island

A visit to the Montauk Lighthouse.

The deadline for our inspections to be completed was early Monday morning and since there were fewer of us at the end, we were working fast to finish up. But we all finished in the nick of time.

About 1 week before work ended I sent for my granddaughter, Bel. Bel is being home schooled this year so it seemed like something good. Bel could help out a little, do her school work when I’d be working and then we could spend a little time at the end just playing around New York.

Bel flew into JFK, fortunately while I was staying at the Marriott as it was lots closer to JFK than the Clarion. She helped keep the room organized, looked for restaurants while on the road and of course did her work. After finishing up on Monday we went to lunch with a couple of other adjusters; just had to clear the head a bit, then we went and started getting ready for home.

On Tuesday we drove out to Montauk Point Lighthouse, located on the easternmost point of Long Island.
On the way to the lighthouse there are lookouts, one the Oyster Pond. The Oyster Pond is a natural pond within the bay. The water fills it when the tides come and then fish are trapped inside when the tide goes out. The Indians would catch fish in it.
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Another lookout is Hither Overlook. http://www.hike-li.org/hitherhills.htm We did not know anything about this lookout, just stopped to see what the view was. Wow, we had the ocean on 2 sides and it was breathtaking.

Once at the lighthouse we paid our $8 and went on the self guided tour. http://www.montauklighthouse.com/ The lighthouse was authorized by President George Washington and completed in 1796. Surrounding buildings are newer and the ground has eroded behind the lighthouse. The erosion is quite a concern and there is a movement to stabilize the ground so that the lighthouse is not lost. There is a display which shows the lighthouse at the time of completion and the keeper’s house, then 3 more displays showing a display for every 100 years or so.
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The 1860 Keeper’s house is now a museum next to the lighthouse. There are lots of old original documents on the lighthouse and various commissions who Ok’d the work which are located in the house. After the museum we then walked up the 137 narrow steps to the top of the lighthouse. The light is operated by the Coast Guard so that part is off limits but there is a small lookout at the top of the house. One can see Connecticut across the bay.
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On the way home we found a farm selling warm fresh corn. So tasty!

Posted by Miss Chris 15:49 Archived in USA Tagged new_york nature landscape travel outdoors grandkids grandkids_travel long_island Comments (0)

Living and Working on Long Island

A brief look at our lives while working on Long Island

The days of working in New York were much the same, drive down to the Marriott, sign in at 6:30am, work in the lobby until I needed to leave for my appointments then off to inspect. In the afternoons I’d go back and write up the estimates, sign out at 6:30pm then off to the Extended Stay. All of our work and hotels were on Long Island.

This routine lasted a week and was well and good but then I realized that I could stay at the Marriott using Priceline. Wow, $89/night what a deal and I didn’t have to leave at 6am to drive down, just walk down the stairs. (Stairs for the exercise)
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The Marriott was so nice after the Extended Stay which was old and dirty. I was ready for a nice place to live again. Plus I was happy that I could actually work in my room where people wouldn’t bother me. There were adjusters who just didn’t know what they were doing, and while I wanted to make sure that the company looked good, it just took way too much of my time to help with basics.

Because I’d stayed so long at the Marriott in Folsom, I’d accumulated lots of reward points and the highest status. Never mind that I’d used all my points in Toronto I hadn’t lost my status! Here I was given access to the top floor where breakfast was served, hors d’ Oeuvres in the evening, water, soda, coffee that downstairs was $3/cup. Not too bad.

Hated to move when we had to at the very end. The Clarion wasn’t any comparison.

The claims varied from totally destroyed houses, completely boarded up houses, houses being rebuilt and those already rebuilt. While I appreciated that all of my inspections were close together, I didn’t appreciate that I had the houses around the golf course, the big houses. I had only a couple of condos. Some people had all condos so had time to sit around. Alas, I had to work but then I got to stay longer.

Fortunately, not all inspections were around the golf course, there were quite a few on the beach with a 2nd bunch of inspections. It is always so hard to imagine how the storm really was when standing looking out at the beach. The water is so peaceful out, gentle waves, blue skies. Then behind is a house where waves washed completely thru it. I’ve seen the same thing over and over again in hurricanes since 1991. The power of water is amazing.

The stories, and each person must tell theirs, varied from barely making it out of the basement moments before being crushed to death by water breaking down the door and rushing in, to houses partially falling down. Others had little damage at all, didn’t leave, but because they lived up a little higher they were able to watch the devastation occur.
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Every storm I get asked how bad that owner’s damage is compared to everyone else or in the whole of all the hurricanes I’ve worked. I always tell people that their damage is the worst for them because it is theirs. A non-answer that seems to make everyone feel good.

Posted by Miss Chris 11:45 Archived in USA Tagged landscapes new_york work adjusting long_island hurricanes Comments (0)

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